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Question #1

The reason the Framers set up three branches of the U.S. government is to make it easier for the government to control the people in America.

False: No way! The people in America control the government by voting for the people they want as representatives and by deciding what the government will control.

Question #2

According to the Constitution, the people of the United States elect the President.

False: The President is elected by the Electoral College; each state and the District of Columbia has a certain number of electoral votes and a president needs at least 270 electoral college votes to win. But don’t get this wrong, every person’s vote still counts!

Question #3

James Madison was worried that the Constitutional Convention was going to be canceled.

True: On the first day of the Convention only delegates from PA and VA showed up. That’s way worse than only a few kids showing up for school on the first day. Good thing the others delegates showed up 11 days later.

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Question #4

Children do not have the same rights as adults.

True: Children don't have all the same rights as adults until they turn 18, like voting, for example. And anyway, if your baby sister, Ticonderoga, who your parents lovingly nicknamed No. 2, could vote, she would probably just drool everywhere.

Question #5

The Constitution states that all men are created equal.

False: The Constitution does NOT say this. This is one of the most famous sentences of the Declaration of Independence. Don’t worry, many people confuse the two documents too.

Question #6

In the United States, we have a federal Constitution and each state has its own constitution.

True: Today all 50 states have their own constitutions, but that wasn’t always the case!

Question #7

Rhode Island refused to attend the Constitutional Convention.

True: Franklin pretended to be an older woman so that his articles could get published in a newspaper. Talk about being a rebellious teen.

Question #8

About half of the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention at one time owned slaves.

True: Talk about irony: writing a document about freedom while having slaves. Slavery was hotly debated during the Constitutional Convention. In 1865, the 13th amendment finally abolished slavery.

Question #9

At 16, Benjamin Franklin faked being a 40-year-old widow.

True: Franklin pretended to be an older woman so that his articles could get published in a newspaper. Talk about being a rebellious teen.

Question #10

The Constitution and the Bill of Rights are just suggestions.

False: The Constitution and the Bill of Rights are much more than a suggestion; they are the highest laws that guarantee our personal freedoms.

Question #11

When the delegates signed the Constitution they were in the largest city of all the colonies.

True: At the time, Philadelphia was the largest city with about 40,000 people. Today, over 1.5 Million people live in Philadelphia.

Question #12

The First amendment guarantees you the freedom of speech, and that means you can say whatever you want, whenever you want.

False: You do have the freedom of speech, BUT there are some limits. For example, you can't use bad words in class to disrupt class lessons. Also, you probably shouldn't tell Ms. Smith about that hairy mole on her nose, but you can organize a group of your friends together to talk to the Principal about Mr. Matthews sleeping during class.

Question #13

All of our Presidents in the U.S. have been U.S. born citizens.

False: The first U.S. born citizen to become President was Martin Van Buren, the 8th President; he was born after the American Revolution. The first seven Presidents before Van Buren and the 9th President were all originally "British subjects" before the revolution.

Question #14

The reason the Framers set up three branches of the U.S. government is to make it easier for the government to control the people in America.

False: No way! The people in America control the government by voting for the people they want as representatives and by deciding what the government will control.

Question #15

Constitution Day is September 17th.

True: Constitution Day is September 17th because it is the anniversary of the day that the Framers signed the Constitution. What a great day for the most important document in American history.

Question #16

The Bill of Rights has always been part of the Constitution.

False: The Bill of Rights was added in 1791 and it includes the first 10 amendments to the Constitution.

Question #17

Each branch of the American government can work independently of the other two branches.

False: Each branch is supervised by the remaining two; this is called a "check and balance" system. For example, Congress can pass a law, but the Supreme Court can declare the law unconstitutional and Supreme Court judges are appointed by the President. Think of your school's safety patrols: the patrols tell you where it's safe to cross the street; a patrol supervisor can change where students can cross the street and patrol supervisors are chosen by the principal.

Question #18

An amendment is a fancy word that means "change."

True: The Amendments to the Constitution are all changes or additions. Did you know that people have suggested over 11,000 amendments to the Constitution but only 27 have been approved? Good thing too - imagine being tested on 11,000 changes to the Constitution.

Question #19

The U.S. Constitution protects the people in America from anyone who violates their civil liberties.

False: The Constitution protects the people from our government. It stops our government from becoming too powerful and doing things that violate the rights of the people.

Question #20

The Constitution is the highest law of the land.

True: In America, federal and state judges must uphold the Constitution, and the rest of us better as well.